Photo Essays, Spot News and Stock Photography

Posts from the ‘Dispatch On Assignment’ category

A homeless Muslim man begs on the streets of Paris c.1950.

THE NO-GO ZONES

A “no-go” zone is defined as an area within a city where law enforcement authorities fear to tread creating an enclave which differs from the general society as a whole. This might include an enclave in which crime cannot be controlled. In the current conversation we a referring to sections of European cities which house large immigrant populations, predominantly Muslim, who have failed to assimilate into the host country’s society. This is not all that unusual as immigrant populations tend to isolate themselves in the first generation only to assimilate more easily in future generations.

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The Great Wall of China and an associated deris field. (1935)

WALLS DON’T WORK

The proposed border wall along the U.S.-Mexico border has been envisioned as being 30 feet high, impossible for one individual to scale without aid, 6 feet in depth under ground, impenetrable for up to one hour by attempts to brake through and aesthetically beautiful on the U. S. side. I refer you to some statistics on the Great Wall of China presented in this blog.

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Honduran family living in poverty c.1939.

WE’RE COMING TO AMERICA

Distended stomachs on children are a sure sign of malnutrition. Date is approximate; true date unknown.

Distended stomachs on children are a sure sign of malnutrition. Date is approximate; true date unknown.

Immigration reform? Let’s get serious. As long as conditions of poverty exist as illustrated in these photos taken in Honduras and Haiti c.1939 what would you do if you had to live under these conditions? The worldwide refugee problem is another issue involving civil wars and forcing people to flee by land and sea to safety.

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It must be remembered that many Japanese cities such as Tokyo, Osaka and Kobe were destroyed by fire bombing. Incendiaries.

THE BOMBING OF JAPANESE CITIES: BLACK RAIN

It must be remembered that many Japanese cities including Tokyo, Osaka and Kobe were destroyed by fire bombing. Incendiaries. The lead photo, “The Bombing of Japanese Cities: Black Rain”; Japan (1945), shows a destroyed Japanese city. “I was 10 when the B-29 came. My family lived underground for three days. When we came up the city was gone. Then the heat brought rain. Black rain. You made the rain black, and shoved your values down our throats.”  Sugai – from the film “Black Rain”.

San Francisco, California - August 16, 1910: A booming extermination business for rodents following the earthquake of 1906. Date is approximate; true date unknown.

HOMAGE TO WALKER EVANS

One of the most respected photographers of the Farm Security Administration during the 1930s was Walker Evans.  Evans’ subjects were varied, but he is perhaps best well known for his images of advertising signs. His work stands out from some of his contemporaries such as Arthur Rothstein, Dorothea Lange, Russell Lee, John Vachon, Marion Post Wolcott and others because of the uniqueness of his style.

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ARCHIVAL QUALITY PRINTS

Archival, museum quality prints of our images are now available from DPI using Giclée printing technology. Prints are made using the Canon iPF 9400, 12 ink Lucia EX pigment set. Your choice of substrates include:

Canvas

Textured Fine Art Paper (Arches or William Turner Hahnehmuhle 325g)

Vibrance Art Paper

Professional Photo Luster Photo Paper (Epson or Kodak)

True Metallic Photo Paper

Enhanced Matted 260g Archival Smooth Art Paper

Pura 325g Smooth Art Paper OBA Free

Pigment inks offer up to 120 years light-fastness and UV-resistance under museum archival conditions. Canvas prints are coated with a layer of anti-fading UV protective clear satin glaze.

Available sizes range from 5 x 7 to 40 x 60.

Contact DPI for pricing at : info@dispatchpressimages.com

THE FRENCH CONNECTION

The contribution of French photo agencies to the field of photojournalism and documentary photography should not be underestimated. One might say that the father of French photojournalism was Henri Cartier-Bresson. His argument that a photo should be taken at the “decisive moment” still holds true. But there have also been major contributions made by Magnum, Gamma-Liason and Sipa photo agencies to illustrate this point that the French have been pioneers in photojournalism. These agencies have set the standard for others to follow including DPI.
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